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Fracture - review

I am slowly reacquainting myself with "proper" YA fiction. Not the type that was written "for adults too", but the pure, teenage targeted, angst and emotion fuelled drama so familiar to my own teenage reading years. 

Fracture by Megan Miranda was the first of my rehabilitation, and it was a very good start.

17 year old Delaney Maxwell drowns in a frozen lake and wakes from a coma 6 days later, to discover she actually died for a short time when she was rescued. Pulled from the waters by her best friend and neighbour Decker, both struggle with the implications of what happened. Delaney should be dead. At the very least she should be severely brain damaged. But she seems fine, except for an inexplicable magnetism towards the dying. As she is drawn to situations of impending death, Delaney meets Troy - who seems to have awoken from a coma with the same attraction to the dying as her. As she struggles with her feelings towards her hero, Decker, and the person who seems to understand her new existence the most, Troy, Delaney is torn between the light and the darkness that her second chance offers.

I finished Fracture in 9 hours on trains to and from Leeds. It kept me entertained the entire way through. Well paced, mysterious and with brilliant characters, the book tackles some great issues while also providing romantic relief - YA gold.

My favourite "issue" portrayed in the book was the relationship between Delaney and her over-protective mother. I could see that the mother's actions were out of fear and love - having already "lost" her child once - and I felt Delaney's reactions to her mother were very honest and believable. The author created the characters with a great sympathy and it really came across well. Delaney also didn't hate her parents - a trap a lot of YA seems to fall to - but disagreed with their treatment of her and rebelled. However, throughout the book, she also came to empathise with her mum. She was simply having teenage reactions to normal parenting. It was subtle, but it made such a difference to the story.

I also enjoyed the romance element of the story (*gasp!*) and I think this was because although it was important, it wasn't central to the plot, and again it felt very honest and unforced.

I wholly recommend this book to any Young Adult fiction fans. Unchallenging but thought provoking, the book is a great read and will definitely be a good companion on these windy, wet , winter days.

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